"It doesn't matter how beautiful your theory is, it doesn't matter how smart you are. If it doesn't agree with experiment, it's wrong." Richard P. Feynman

Saturday, November 20, 2010

Smart Grid Allows Big Brother Complete Control

The ultimate in micro-regulation is what the Smart Grid represents. Someone in a remote place will be able to decide which appliances you can run and turn off the others. 


"Smart grids are a lot about empowering us to engage with energy," says Scott Lang, CEO of SilverSpring Networks, a California-based company leading the way in developing technology that allows customers to view their electricity usage at any given point, including from individual appliances.
While this enables households to cut bills by using energy-consuming devices at low-rate times of day, it also enables utility companies to cut peak-time demand and avoid costly blackouts.
The need for a better alignment between supply and demand is also being driven by renewable energies and the forecast rise in plug-in electric cars, already in evidence on the roads around Silicon Valley.
We have always had off-peak water heating but that was not compulsory and was driven by appropriate discounts to reward those who complied.
Of course these smart grid controls are really controlled blackouts which have become necessary due to reliance  on the vagaries of intermittent "green"power rather than build the base load generation a modern society needs. Another nail in the coffin of free choice and individual liberty.

2 comments:

  1. I can see the queue of electric cars waiting to get a re-charge and at the back of the line those waiting to plug in their kidney dialysis machines!

    Tommo
    Cent Qld

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  2. That's the goal of smartgrid, to enable utilities to control power in the home wether you like it or not. It's hard to see a cost model which works for a consumer given the cost of the electronics and any possible power savings (well, none really) [I work in this field].

    However it is easy to see the benifit for utilities who will desperately need fast load shedding to:

    (1) keep the base load power station to the minimum and...

    (2) deal with the sudden changes in the power fed into the grid from intermittant supplies for example wind or solar PV. The base load stations being in the main coal/gas/"N word" have a response time which exceeds the response time needed to cope with the wind dropping for example...

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