"It doesn't matter how beautiful your theory is, it doesn't matter how smart you are. If it doesn't agree with experiment, it's wrong." Richard P. Feynman

Friday, August 22, 2014

More Looney Tunes than Disneyland


The takeover of journalism by the left is starkly shown by a   complaint currently being adjudicated by the Press Council headed by Julian Disney which is likely to be upheld. . The complaint revolves around an article in the Australian by their food writer John Lethlean which expressed his approval of kangaroo meat without expressing the views of those opposing it. Bear in mind that kangaroo meat is available at the local supermarket and culling of kangaroos out west is a pastoral necessity.
That's the nuts and bolts of it. The reality, regardless of your perspective, is confronting. I grew up in the country; shooting animals - yes, kangaroos, occasionally - on farms was part of those adolescent years. I am an advocate for eating kangaroo for a host of reasons, not the least being that it's wild. And wild food is increasingly a luxury for those of us who like to eat well and naturally.
 As decision time draws near the Australian outlines the case:
The Australian’s food writer, John Lethlean, has been living with the kangaroo case ever since he wrote about his passionate belief that “wild” food such as kangaroo meat should be more widely consumed in Australia.
His January 11 article made his view clear: “I am an advocate for eating kangaroo for a host of reasons, not the least being that it’s wild. And wild food is increasingly a luxury for those of us who like to eat well and naturally.”
When it comes to food, Lethlean writes with authority. He spent 15 years as chief food critic for The Age and was founding editor of The Age Good Food Guide.
Food writers, like all critics, normally have wide latitude to express opinion, such as in the case of drama and art critics. But in this case the Press Council opened the door on whether that freedom of opinion should be qualified.
Enter the Australian Society of Kangaroos. By February, this organisation — which was not mentioned in Lethlean’s article — had persuaded the Press Council to launch its complaint-handling procedures.
The Press Council’s complaint note served on this newspaper lists four of the society’s grievances. But one goes to the heart of things.
Was Lethlean wrong to express his opinion? Should he, as asserted by the ASK, have included contrary views from those such as ... the ASK?
Were that argument to succeed, it could transform the way newspapers handle opinion by requiring the inclusion of contrary views.
A typical “balanced” opinion could be: “I thought the play was great — but on the other hand it was terrible.”
The complaint note was structured in a way that ensured this case became a forum for debate on issues that matter to the ASK. How many kangaroos does Australia really have? Is it between 35 million and 50 million — as asserted by Lethlean? Or is it really just 35 million — as asserted by the ASK?
The Left want opposing views aired on all their pet subjects but not global warming!

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